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Infradeploy

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Reply with quote  #1 
I think delivering global content is part of net neutrality. The companies that deliver global content have so much limits on where you are, and i find it more and more annoying and inconvenient. I find myself spending more and more time to circumvent these rules. Google, Apple and Microsoft with their games and apps, Netflix and Amazon with their tv and movies, Amazon with books. The things i have to do to buy books from the american store on my kindle is very close to fraud. With Netflix I did not subscribe to Dutch Netflix, but just Netflix, and they make it impossible to watch from a VPN and access other countries.

They are driving me to piracy, which to be honest is far easier than accessing legal content. 

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Wobble_Wibble

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yes by 2000%

Trying to read my new paper subscription in Bulgaria for an Irish pay wall site....baa a humbug
Netflix I gave up on and have a thing that brings me things.

It's not like I wasn't, didn't don't pay.
Give me good old capitalism any day.

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Howard2nd

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Reply with quote  #3 
Wow! It is NOT the companies, it is your government. Netflix would love to have one system worldwide, local businesses use local governments to channel your purchases to their benefit. eBay has to know where you are because they cannot offer to sell somethings in some countries. Movies and Music have distorted the marketplace so badly it can take years to resolve copyright issues. Every attempt to 'simplify' copyright in the last century has ended up with longer terms of protection, fewer items in the 'Public Domain' and more draconian punishment for infringers.

If you want to watch what I watch, you have to move here. Or convince your government that making local interests paramount is bad business. Good luck!

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wobble_wobble

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Reply with quote  #4 
Not quite sure it's the government's fault for all.
As an EU member I'm allowed free trade across all EU borders. So the pay wall issue is possibly piracy. But trust me not the Irish or Bulgarian government blocking me. Both are too lazy.
Netflix, I believe that's the different media giants afraid of piracy. Right that worked real well.
Amazon that's them as far as I know making it easy for them. They license you based on home account + CC. Not sure what Ton does to get kindle books. I just suffer the UK site because Ireland is the UK on a .co.UK site, just like Microsoft has us ( the irish as Northern Europe, western Europe, and not part of Zune/ Cortina/ cheap Surface Pro books.
Prime example of big business...
Nexus 6P in the States $400 (358 Euro), in Ireland $559 (500 Euro) but where I am right now (Bulgaria) Google won't sell me one!
There are some things can't travel, but the usual urban consumer goods should be easily portable.

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cj_berlin

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Reply with quote  #5 
WARNING: This is getting off the original topic, but here's a dangerous statement I simply can't let go uncommented. Those who knew me on the old forum know that...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard2nd
Every attempt to 'simplify' copyright in the last century has ended up with longer terms of protection, fewer items in the 'Public Domain' and more draconian punishment for infringers.

Howard,

I do not know you or what you have contributed so far to the humanity's treausre trove of arts or science. It just may be that you have written (painted, sung, played, recorded and filmed) tons of bestseller-grade content that you contributed to the public domain instead of having it published in the usual way (i.e. bringing a meagre benefit to the author). In this case, I apologise. But if you haven't, I don't think you really are qualified to b!tch about the lack of content in the public domain and should consider where content comes from before continuing to do so.

I know quite a few good people who try to make their living out of their art. You move everything they produce into public domain, they have nothing to eat. It really is that simple.

As a rule, artists are generous people. But we as consumers really need to leave it to them (or, at the very least, to the publishers) to decide which content gets released into the public domain and when. You want more content in the PD? Here are two things you can do:
  1. Produce some and release it for free
  2. Become a publisher, buy some content from the respective authors and release it for free




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donoli

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Reply with quote  #6 
Part of the problem, at least on the American side of the Atlantic, has to do with the RIAA & the MPAA.  I don't know how far their power extends, around the world but I'm sure it's more than most, of us presume.

Personally, I don't watch movies.  If every movie were cancelled, it wouldn't bother me in the least.
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DennisMCSE

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Reply with quote  #7 
Just because the company is global, like Netflix or Amazon, doesn't mean the content they have is being distributed globally. If you remember last year, Disney sold distribution rights to Netflix for the movie Star Wars: The Force Awakens, but only in Canada. So Canada was the only territory globally that Netflix was allowed to show the content. Not even available in the US. The content will be available in other territories eventually, but the content deals need to be worked out between the content owner and the distributor (and in some countries, the government, if they censor the content). And that's so that the content owner gets their fair share of the money. If everything was pushed out in the public domain without a distribution contract, then the content owner wouldn't get the money owed to him for all his/her work and effort.

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Infradeploy

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm not saying 'public', and i know how publishers and government regulations work. I do not have to agree though. I really do not understand how publishers say do not get their money while I have a paying subscription and there is nothing in my subscription listed that is saying i am not allowed content for other countries. [edit] maybe there is now[/edit]

For example, the moment Amazon had a Dutch subsidiary I knew i was in trouble. I love my kindle and i buy every book i read. But from that moment on they are pushing me to a Dutch subscription with Dutch books, and i raised hell to keep my account in the states and i could buy those books without jumping through hoops. My girlfriend, who is South African and can't read Dutch was forced in a Dutch Kindle. Still now, for every 5 books she buys she needs contact support to buy 5 more. It doesn't need to be that difficult. I know the Dutch Amazon probably payed good money for all the accounts listed there but if that's not for me i think i am allowed to make a choice.

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