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DennisMCSE

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Reply with quote  #1 
So Yahoo was breached a little while ago and now it's Google's turn:

https://www.herjavecgroup.com/gooligan/

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jsclmedave

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisMCSE
So Yahoo was breached a little while ago and now it's Google's turn:

https://www.herjavecgroup.com/gooligan/



"The Gooligan malware roots infected devices and steals authentication tokens that can be used to access data from Google Play, Gmail, Google Photos, Google Docs, G Suite, Google Drive, and more.

Gooligan potentially affects devices on Android 4 (Jelly Bean, KitKat) and 5 (Lollipop)."

My Windows 1520 Phone just keeps on working with no issues.  Not a lot of apps..!  But not a lot of issues either...  : )


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wobble_wobble

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsclmedave


My Windows 1520 Phone just keeps on working with no issues.  Not a lot of apps..!  But not a lot of issues either...  : )



Betamax...

and you can't even get the bad porm

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JamesNT

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Reply with quote  #4 
I thought the cloud was safe!  I thought the cloud was impenetrable! 

Was someone blowing smoke up my ass? 

BUT MORE IMPORTANLY, WAS THAT PUN INTENDED????

JamesNT

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donoli

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
I thought the cloud was safe!  I thought the cloud was impenetrable!


Presuming that your statements weren't sarcasm, I'll say: Of course, the cloud providers told you that!  How else could they sell their services?  The way I understand it is that the purchaser of a cloud service has no ability to adjust the security as they would if they rented what's called a "dedicated server".  I haven't compared the prices, of each. My guess is that the cloud is cheaper.  That would be another selling point, if that's true.  The "buyer beware" quote might be considered.
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wobble_wobble

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Reply with quote  #6 
Sounds more like a modern keylogger that an exploit of Google.
Until such time as some of the carbon units stop doing silly things, opening mails they shouldn't and clicking on links in Facebook or ads they will always be open.

Oh and they are all local admin. Might as well leave their wallets and purses on the bar counter and walk out.


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donoli

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Sounds more like a modern keylogger that an exploit of Google.


Calling it a keylogger & silly doesn't minimize it's effects.

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wobble_wobble

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Reply with quote  #8 
Nope, it doesn't.

But people don't tend to leave their wallets or purses on a bar counter and expect it to "be safe"
Yet they appear to believe that everything on the internet is true, valid and safe.

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donoli

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
But people don't tend to leave their wallets or purses on a bar counter and expect it to "be safe"


IMO, using the cloud is exactly that.  The US Federal Government uses Akamai Cloud services.  Not a day goes by that you don't hear claims that Russia tainted the recent election.  Never leave a government on the bar & expect it to be save.
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JamesNT

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by donoli


Presuming that your statements weren't sarcasm, I'll say: Of course, the cloud providers told you that!  How else could they sell their services?  The way I understand it is that the purchaser of a cloud service has no ability to adjust the security as they would if they rented what's called a "dedicated server".  I haven't compared the prices, of each. My guess is that the cloud is cheaper.  That would be another selling point, if that's true.  The "buyer beware" quote might be considered.


No.  The cloud is not cheaper.  In fact, I today had to deal with a situation where the cloud is more expensive.  The client in question had two choices:

Purchase Windows Server 2016 Standard with 20 Remote Desktop Server CALS and then have me upgrade their server for $950.  Total cost:  $3771.00

Or, pay the cloud provider that tried to push their stuff onto the client $233 per month for one server.

ONE.  SERVER.

After 17 months the cloud becomes way more expensive because that $233 per month ain't stopping.

And that's what I'm seeing.  If the client has good IT, then on-prem is cheaper than the cloud. 

JamesNT

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donoli

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Reply with quote  #11 
If the cloud is more expensive & less secure, I don't see how it became so popular.  What happened to a local data center that rents rack space?
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JamesNT

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Reply with quote  #12 
donoli,

The cloud is popular because it allows enterprises to expand their datacenters without having to tear down walls and buy more cooling to expand the datacenters they already have.  Which makes sense.  Furthermore, the smart enterprises are moving things they don't care about to the cloud but the really important stuff stays close where they can keep an eye on it.  There are three types of data:

1.  Nice to have.  Losing this data will cost you some money and you won't like it, but you can live without it.

2.  Need to have.  Losing this data will hurt your company severely and you won't be profitable for a while.  You'll also have a public black eye.  Losing this data could do you in, but if you're lucky and good at handling a ship in a storm, you may yet survive.  Think Target.

3.  Bankruptcy.  Losing this data means you declare bankruptcy.  Literally.  You are on the phone with a bankruptcy lawyer THE VERY NEXT DAY. 

Data that fits in category one can go to the cloud.  Perhaps some of category 2 can.  None of category 3 can.

Regardless of those guidelines, the cloud is also popular because some companies honestly don't give a crap about security or anything and they just want to get rid of all this IT stuff they really need and lay off their IT people as fast as they can.

But for small businesses, things are more complex.  I can get Dell R710's off of eBay for less than $1,000 with dual six core procs.  I can also get MD3200's with fully stocked drives for around $2,000.  What this means is that for around $8,000 many SMB's can have their own Hyper-V cluster on-prem.  And that's still cheaper than hosting a SharePoint and SQL Server along with a file server and domain controller in the cloud for 5 years.

That being said, many SMB's go to the cloud because they can't find a good IT person like us.  Many of these country bumpkins running around that claim to be IT people can't find their way out of a paper bag.  So the cloud may be the only choice some SMB's have.

It is what it is.

JamesNT

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jsclmedave

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesNT
donoli,

The cloud is popular because it allows enterprises to expand their datacenters without having to tear down walls and buy more cooling to expand the datacenters they already have.  Which makes sense.  Furthermore, the smart enterprises are moving things they don't care about to the cloud but the really important stuff stays close where they can keep an eye on it.  There are three types of data:

1.  Nice to have.  Losing this data will cost you some money and you won't like it, but you can live without it.

2.  Need to have.  Losing this data will hurt your company severely and you won't be profitable for a while.  You'll also have a public black eye.  Losing this data could do you in, but if you're lucky and good at handling a ship in a storm, you may yet survive.  Think Target.

3.  Bankruptcy.  Losing this data means you declare bankruptcy.  Literally.  You are on the phone with a bankruptcy lawyer THE VERY NEXT DAY. 

Data that fits in category one can go to the cloud.  Perhaps some of category 2 can.  None of category 3 can.

Regardless of those guidelines, the cloud is also popular because some companies honestly don't give a crap about security or anything and they just want to get rid of all this IT stuff they really need and lay off their IT people as fast as they can.

But for small businesses, things are more complex.  I can get Dell R710's off of eBay for less than $1,000 with dual six core procs.  I can also get MD3200's with fully stocked drives for around $2,000.  What this means is that for around $8,000 many SMB's can have their own Hyper-V cluster on-prem.  And that's still cheaper than hosting a SharePoint and SQL Server along with a file server and domain controller in the cloud for 5 years.

That being said, many SMB's go to the cloud because they can't find a good IT person like us.  Many of these country bumpkins running around that claim to be IT people can't find their way out of a paper bag.  So the cloud may be the only choice some SMB's have.

It is what it is.

JamesNT


Scalability is another one that I have seen for a reason to be in the cloud.  End of year hits and you need more RAM, Disk Space, Processor Power and even a couple more SQL boxes added to your cluster.  All can be spun up in minutes As Needed...

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donoli

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Reply with quote  #14 
JamesNT, Where would 'customer data that must be protected' fit in your 3 categories?  Wherever it fits, that data type doesn't belong in a cloud even if the company has to buy a few extra air conditioners.
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JamesNT

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Reply with quote  #15 
I agree.  Remember my sentence that read:

"Regardless of those guidelines, the cloud is also popular because some companies honestly don't give a crap about security or anything and they just want to get rid of all this IT stuff they really need and lay off their IT people as fast as they can."

Et tu, Target?

JamesNT

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