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jaxdave

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Where did the time go ?  
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jsclmedave

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hee,,, its been a fun ride!!

BTW we will be in Destin FL this weekend. We're staying at Eglin AFB.  I will be the guy they are trying to push back into the ocean.   : ) 

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dennis-360ict

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Happy retiring!

I planned to be retiring on my 40th, but that didn't happen..

O well, i would probably be doing the same as i would be doing now.. B-)

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Mark

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Dennis, I had the same problem.  When I started the business when I was 26 (I think), I was so friggin' brilliant and hardworking that I figured I could retire by 35.  Ah, but that passed and not enough money in the bucket.  Well, then, maybe 40?  Nope.  Finally I stopped worrying about it and just ran the spreadsheet every six months to see what would work and the good number finally popped out. [smile]
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cspanburgh

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Some of us just don't buy into the retirement thing.   My job is always changing.  I would do other jobs too as well.   If I travel, I do not like the tourist stuff.  I have lots of people in life.  I would assist some people with projects, etc.

I think if I was really Sick, I would be forced into it.  Even then............work is a blessing.

Work, not servitude.

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Curt Spanburgh
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Mark Minasi

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I'm glad you feel that way still, Curt.  That's excellent.

For me, I liked figuring out the essential and new things and figuring out how to explain them best.  There just isn't all that much new.

Retirement will let me spend time learning in fields where there's lots to learn.  Getting better at photography, exploring Florida, keeping up on science.  That kinda thing.
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cspanburgh

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I know what you mean Mark.    When I was young, I wanted to be a biologist or a biochemist.

I still study that with enthusiasm.   But we were broke and my older brother was in Nam.  It was a bad time as you remember.    But I kept up my interest.

I remember doing a project at a biotech and I passed a white board in one of the offices.  I commented on the number of benzene cycles in the molecular diagram.  The two biologist there said, "Why would a IT guy, know something about benzene cycles?".    I just looked at them and said, “Why not".

FYI: Later, I was on a project where we had to manage large documents of Molecular diagrams for a big Pharma firm and manage the changes in them.   Scientist needed to share and explore them in collaboration.   It was a very cool project done in Share Point.  It was also a great deal of responsibility.   It felt good working on a project that would help a disease.



But Mark, you have the ability to make something understandable and to have the audience conceptualize a complex subject, so that they are then empowered to explore the complexities of a subject.    Somewhat like putting a plate on the table before serving the steak.  The mind is prepared for the meat of the matter to come.   

A very good quality.   Although we know that often even the folks at MSFT do not the details right.  Seems like "FACTS" change all the time.

I loved the meeting we had one time where the PM said "We thought we understood how this process worked, but now we realize we don't ....... and we are trying to figure it out".   Well, I love such a honest approach.   

Whoa, I have to hit the salt mines again.   Later!!!



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Curt Spanburgh
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DennisMCSE

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Minasi
I'm glad you feel that way still, Curt.  That's excellent.

For me, I liked figuring out the essential and new things and figuring out how to explain them best.  There just isn't all that much new.

Retirement will let me spend time learning in fields where there's lots to learn.  Getting better at photography, exploring Florida, keeping up on science.  That kinda thing.



Mark,

I ended up getting a subscription to the Great Courses Plus. Unlimited streaming of pretty much any of their courses for a year. You can view any of their full courses, or just pick and choose individual classes from any of the courses that interest you. Great way to learn something new about almost anything.


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Mark Minasi

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You're going to like them.  Some things you might miss:

- The Story of Human Language and John McWhorter's series on language.  Both great.
- 48 lectures on ancient Egypt.  Amazing.
- I forget the name, but it's something like "ancient religions in the near east" or the like.  It goes back so far they don't even get to Judaism until the halfway point.
- The new paleontology series by the guy out of Wales.
- The 72 lectures on medieval life by Phillip Dalrypel (something like that) out of William and Mary
- 12 lectures on CS Lewis.  Wasn't that interested in the guy but it really was great.
- 24 lectures (I think) on ancient Britain.  The speaker's voice is a mite difficult to listen to but good content.
- Anything by Bart Ehrman.  He's done a bunch of talks on the historical Jesus.  Love 'em all.

What did it cost?
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DennisMCSE

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Mark,

The Great Courses Plus is about $180 a year, but you get access to all their streaming courses. Considering how much I was spending on the courses a year picking and choosing courses, I saw it as a cost savings. If you sign up, you get one month free to try it out.

https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/explore

I like the one's:

- Heroes and Legends: The Most Influential Characters of Literature.
- The Joy of Science by Robert Hazen (or anything by Robert Hazen)
- Any of the ones from the Culinary Institute of America (if you like cooking)
- A New History of Life (just started this one)
- How Great Science Fiction Works (another one I'm just starting)

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Mark

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Reply with quote  #11 
Certainly worth it if you're listening a half hour every day on the treadmill!

Haven't checked out the CIA stuff but that's a great idea!  The Jean Simonetti series on wine was really great.

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