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anthony

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Reply with quote  #1 
So I have the Canon T3i which is a crop sensor camera (APS-C).

When I shop for lenses, there are lenses that are made for full-frame cameras, and those made especially for the crop sensor cameras.

If I'm looking at a full frame lens, I know I need to multiply the size by 1.6 to get what it would be on a APS-C camera.

But... if I see a lens that is designed for an APS-C camera, do I still need to do the multiplication? I don't right? I just want to make sure...

I'm looking at getting into Macro photography, and I was looking at the EF-S 60mm Macro lens as well as the EF 100mm Macro (both are f/2.8).

I do plan on moving to full frame someday... but I really have no idea when. It could be years from now.

My other concern is that with the 60mm I think I would need to be much closer to the subject than with the 100mm, but the 100 being upconverted to 160mm that might be too far away to get a steady shot.

What are your thoughts? [smile]

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wkasdo

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Reply with quote  #2 
>  if I see a lens that is designed for an APS-C camera, do I still need to do the multiplication? I don't right?

You actually do. The units have been standardized on full-frame.

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anthony

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Reply with quote  #3 
So why do these lenses not work the same on a full frame camera? And what's the point of making it specifically for the crop sensor camera?
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JimiV

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Reply with quote  #4 

You are going to be much better off with the 100.  More lens to subject distance is almost always better.   I had a 55, 105, and 200 mm macro lenses.  Always used the 200. I used it mostly for close ups of models putting on eye makeup for adverts and editorial stuff. 

Macro can be a really tricky and depending on exactly what you are looking to do, you probably really don't need the ability to shoot true 1:1     Pulling back a little will give you an improvement of DOF, a bit easier focus and lighting.  

In film days, yeah, you pretty much had to be right in there. But with today's digital, you can be back a bit and later crop in to get the effect you want.   Doing it with a macro lens, even pulled back a bit, will give you that super flat field that macro lens are designed to produce.

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wkasdo

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Reply with quote  #5 
> And what's the point of making it specifically for the crop sensor camera

The projected image of an aps-c lens is too small for a full-frame sensor. It simply does not fit! The advantage of an aps-c lens is that it's smaller and cheaper than a comparable full-frame lens. That's all.

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